ads by google

» Welcome to Sydney Australia!
» Things to Eat in Sydney: The Sydney Dining Challenge
» Excursions from Sydney: The Reptile Park
» Other Things to See in Australia: carnarvon gorge
» australia overview: the land down under
» history
» the australian personality
» the australian landscape
» Study in Australia
» Study Chinese Medicine in Melbourne
» media jobs in australia
» social issue: is australia a nanny state?
Eastwood, a Chinese/Korean enclave in the leafy northern suburbs of Sydney, Australia
Eastwood, a Chinese/Korean Enclave in the Leafy Northern Suburbs of Sydney, NSW

Frog and Toad's Aboriginal Australia

Nan Tien Taiwanese Temple, Near Wollongong, NSW

Asian Wisdom

Traditional Chinese Medicine: Yin/Yang of Foods

Traditional Chinese Medicine: Yin/Yang of Food


Recommended Weblogs & Websites


» Inside a Chinese Herbal Medicine Shop in Hong Kong (The Guardian)
» The Meridian Organ Clock
» What is the Difference Between Classical and Traditional Chinese Medicine?





introduction to chinese medicine // accredited courses // acupuncture // art of diagnosis // does melbourne have a chinatown? // melbourne college of natural medicine // royal melbourne institute of technology (rmit) // shiatsu


STUDY TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE IN MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA
IF YOU WANT TO STUDY TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE (TCM) IN MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, THIS SITE MIGHT BE ABLE TO HELP YOU OUT. I have to confess, I am not really an expert in the field (although I am hoping to become one.) I am an Australian, and I am hoping to live for a few years in the Middle Kingdom, starting from 2014. WHEN I WAS LIVING IN JAPAN in the 00s, in the latter days at least, I used to feel like I was a bridge between the East and the West, the Orient and the Occident; about the same time, hanging out in Vietnam, I came to view myself as a conduit between the Global South and the Global North. In the bagua East and West are of course the two opposites, forever clashing, forever rolling upon each other... but from their dance springs the creativity of the Universe. In the eyes of Al Qaeda and the Venezulean socialists, the North is the oppressor of the South, stripping it of everything of worth... it's doubtless true, but in the process of the oppression, elements of the South are seeping out to infuse the North, and vice versa. Amit Singhal grew up in a village in India watching Star Trek on a black-and-white TV and dreaming of the future; later in life he emigrated to the United States, where he is in charge of search at Google. Of all the great developments of modern times, from the Internet to the atomic bomb, one of the most profound, and still ongoing, has been this connection of Eastern cultures with the cultures of the West, and intercourse between the economies of the South with the economies of the North. Let's not forget, that it was from the collision of European melody and African rhythm, that Rock'n'Roll was born! From the collision of reggae and house music, drum&bass was spawn! There is an inherent creativity springing from the interface of different worlds, so much so in fact, that I really think the interface is the place to be. The Interface is where cool stuff happens. Amit Singhal will tell you that!

Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.

TO COMPREHEND how Chinese medicine works, you have to understand how Chinese people think and explain the workings of the world. To my mind, Asians have a more holistic view of the cosmos than we Westerners do, but they do have their own elemental system, which they call the Five Elements or Wu Xing. In contrast to the Western elements, which are largely concrete and immovable, the Chinese elements are constantly in motion, endlessly rotating around each other, crashing against each other, consuming each other, in the eternal dance of Yin/Yang polarities. Wood is nurtured by water but gives way to fire when it is set alight, for example, while water will put the fire out. Metal is mined from the earth, and can be made into an ax, to chop down wood. Metal seems to be all powerful, the strongest element of all, but it can be melted by fire, which doesn't even have a body! One might recall the popular East Asian "Rock, Scissors, Paper" game (called janken in Japan), which illustrates the organic perspective and awareness of Oriental thought. No one element is superior to the other, and they all live with each other as part of a (sometimes tumultuous) harmony (but then again, harmony and tumult are but two sides of the same coin, and are constantly squaring off!) There can be no stability without change, nor change without stability.

Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.

I CONSIDER MYSELF as freestyler, in traditional Chinese medicine, and everything else in life. I don't follow a set program, and I make my own rules (subject to verification and experimentation, of course!) I don't have an ideology, beyond the ideology of winging it. I don't even know that much about the subject (although I am hoping that will change over time.) I have heard that it generally takes 2-4 years to study for TCM in Australia. To see courses recognised by the Australian Natural Therapists Association (ANTA), click here. To see programs accredited by the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia, click here.

To begin, you have to be under 45 years of age, you have to have studied for more than two cupations on the DIAC Skilled Occupation List (SOL).

Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on the streets of Cho Lon in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on the streets of Cho Lon in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on the streets of Cho Lon in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on the streets of Cho Lon in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.

Traditional Chinese herbal doctors measure the patient's pulse as part of the diagnosis. "There, you can learn about the points test and see which occupations make you eligible for skilled migration.

"The  E80 sub-class visa Eis not the only way for an international student to become eligible for permanent residency in Australia. The rules are complex and if you want to become a permanent resident of Australia after you graduate you need more information.

"We suggest that you do two things.

If you are still at the stage of thinking about whether or not you will study in Australia then the decision about whether you will one day want to use your Australian educational qualification to help you get permanent residency in Australia is several years away.

Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.Chinese medicinal herbs for sale on a street in Cho Lon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Picture copyright Robert Sullivan 2010.

So even if you choose a course which will give you the points you need when you graduate, by the time you do graduate the condition

Melbourne College of Natural Medicine: .
Approved for acupuncture.

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT): . For Traditional Chinese Medicine course details, click here.

In 2008, RMIT established the Chinese Medicine Confucius Institute (CMCI) through a collaboration with Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, China. Courses available include a Bachelor in Health Science in acupuncture and Chinese manual therapy, and a Bachelor of Applied Science in Chinese medicine. The university also offers a Master of Applied Science in Chinese Herbal Medicine and acupuncture, both of which is approved by the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia. As one of the first activities of the CMCI, a Chinese culture and Chinese Medicine History Museum was set up and over 300 items of artefacts for the museum are on display. RMIT University acknowledges the generosity and technical support provided by the Guangdong Provincial Chinese Medicine Museum, China. Southern School of Natural Therapies: .

Victoria University: .

Australia Skilled Immigration Points Calculator: If you would like to assess your own chances of gaining a permanent residency visa for Australia based on the points system, complete this online form and your points score will be calculated for you! Study and Work in Australia Online Chat: Australia is fast becoming a favourite destination for students looking to study abroad.
this is because Australian schools are cheaper than schools in other countries. Admissions are also easier, he adds. However, getting a job there is another story. Karan enlightened readers on Australia as a study destination, during a chat on February 15 ().
For those of you who missed the chat, here's the transcript.


SHIATSU means "finger pressure" in Japanese...

 

Akihabara Japan - Christiana Denmark - Kathmandu Nepal - Sydney Dining Challenge - Reykjavik Iceland