A lot of people take the PTE because they think it is easier than IELTS. The PTE is machine-marked, which might make it attractive to those who worry about encountering biased examiners in IELTS.

Like IELTS, this test covers Speaking and Writing, Reading, and Listening. In the PTE, however, these modules are merged. For example, you will be asked to listen to a lecture, and then retell it in your own words.

SPEAKING & WRITING TEST

As the name implies, there are two components of this test. The Speaking Test is 30 to 35 minutes long, and has five components: Reading a passage; repeating a sentence; describing an image; retelling a lecture; and answering a question. When looking at the graphs, keep in mind that they usually have two axes, an x-axis, and a y-axis. There are three to four lectures, each 60 to 90 seconds long. You will have 40 seconds to retell each lecture.
Be careful of making plosive "p" and "b" sounds when speaking into the microphone... this can affect your score. Be aware that the examiners are looking for "native-like English" in this test. If you get a low pronunciation score in the PTE, you have probably not mastered the 44 Sounds of English. You will also be scored for Oral Fluency.
Try to complete your sentences... you will get 5% for Oral Fluency.
Repeat sentences: "Psychology helps you understand why people are the way they are, and why they do the things they do."
Answering Short Questions: Questions might include: "What emergency service is usually called when one is in trouble at sea? Ambulance, or coast guard?"

READING TEST

Part 2 is Reading.

WRITING TEST

Summarize a text. It is important to see the big picture.

Reordering paragraphs can be tricky even for native speakers.

Suggested essay questions here: click here.

LISTENING TEST

In the Dictation section, you get one point for each word correctly spelled. Bear in mind that the human brain is geared to remembering collections of phrases, rather than strings of individual words.

IELTS to PTE Calculator: click here